This page is designed to collate resources in the study of the decolonization of the curriculum. If you have questions or additional sources in mind that warrant attention, please contact me.


 Carl Jung (centre) in Kenya, 1925. When Carl Jung visited eastern Africa, in 1925, his aim was to identify the relationship between two ostensibly primitive worlds: the deepest recesses of human psychology (dreams), on the one hand, and a savage hinterland (Africa), on the other.  Similarly, Jung’s older colleague, Sigmund Freud, argued that dreams, like African societies, signified untamed wildernesses that needed to be subdued and civilised (source of image: Carl Jung,  Letters, edited by  Gerhard Adler & Aniela Jaffé,  2 vols,  Princeton: Princeton University Press), 1973–75.

Carl Jung (centre) in Kenya, 1925. When Carl Jung visited eastern Africa, in 1925, his aim was to identify the relationship between two ostensibly primitive worlds: the deepest recesses of human psychology (dreams), on the one hand, and a savage hinterland (Africa), on the other.  Similarly, Jung’s older colleague, Sigmund Freud, argued that dreams, like African societies, signified untamed wildernesses that needed to be subdued and civilised (source of image: Carl Jung, Letters, edited by Gerhard Adler & Aniela Jaffé, 2 vols, Princeton: Princeton University Press), 1973–75.

Teaching Resources

Teaching Decolonization Resource Collection | National History Center

The Teaching Decolonization Resource Collection provides a range of materials to support the study of decolonization in the classroom. This diverse collection of resources is, in part, an outgrowth of the National History Center's decade-long International Decolonization Seminar. Primary and secondary sources are organized by region and theme; teaching resources can be found in educational materials.

 
 

Blogs

 

Seminars and Workshops